Wisdom of others: best books I read in 2016

Note that these are books I read in 2016, not necessarily those that were published in 2016.

Wealth of Humans – Ryan Avent

A great overview of the major trends that will affect employment, wages, and politics over the coming decades. This book significantly increased my belief that wage subsidies may be a key policy for increasing individual meaning and societal stability as we transition to the digital age. I reviewed the book here.

The Sovereign Individual: Mastering the Transition to the Information Age – James Dale Davidson and Lord William Rees-Mogg

This books wins the award for “highest authorial confidence in opinions I disagree with” – yet it made me think a lot, and I value books for the thoughts they generate just as much as the claims that are made.

The Age of Em: Work, Love and Life when Robots Rule the Earth – Robin Hanson

A fascinating book of predictions based on the idea of (1) applying social science literature to (2) hard science trends to (3) try to predict the future. I reviewed the book here.

Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence, and the Rules that Run the World -Leif Wenar

Wenar’s argument – that we should not buy oil and minerals from states where the people have not given their assent for the sale – seems morally correct and politically impossible, for now. But the seeds of change often begin with clear arguments. Hopefully Wenar will have influence over the coming decades.

The Scapegoat – Rene Girard

Girard, a Christian, makes the argument that profoundness of Jesus’ death stems from the fact that it marks a historical shift in empathy: instead of siding with the mob that kills the outsider, with Jesus we side with the outsider.

I found this to be a compelling and beautiful argument. It also supports my belief that the origins of Christianity and Buddhism are intertwined with the transition from hunter and gather to agricultural societies. In a hunter and gather society, the group is everything. In agricultural societies, high degrees of inequality create more within group class based conflict, which opens up space for spiritual traditions based on poverty / outsiders / individual suffering / etc.

A People’s History of the United States – Howard Zinn

I’d never read it before. I’m only 25% finished as it’s so brutal to read. But it adds important context to the tales we’ve been told.

The Spoils of War: Greed, Power, and the Conflicts That Made Our Greatest PresidentsBruce Bueno de Mesquita, Alastair Smith

A good company on to Zinn. I didn’t agree with everything in this book but I like the framework: analyzing presidential war time decisions based on personal desires and psychology rather than simply national interest. I found the arguments about the Revolutionary War to be most compelling (war fueled in part by desire for territorial expansion and land owner wealth accumulation). Also right notes that we give too much status to war time presidents and not enough status to economic growth / peace presidents.

The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads – Tim Wu

Wu makes a strong argument that “fake news” is a structural problem with deep historical roots: so long as advertisements drive revenues for media, we’ll always have problems with the consequences of fighting for eyeballs.

The Populist Explosion: How the Great Recession Transformed American and European Politics – Judis

Most interesting takeaway: leftist populist movements tend to involve two groups (the people vs. the elite) while right wing populist movements tend to involve three groups (the people vs. the elite + an out group).

The Last Days of Night: A Novel – Graham Moore

A great historical fiction novel about the corporate wars to win the race of making money off the electrification of America.

Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis – J.D. Vance

Made me think deeper about the historical perseverance of culture.

The Rise and Fall of Nations: Forces of Change in the Post-Crisis World – Ruchir Sharma

Re-enforced the power of creating frameworks that combine the right metrics with psycho / social / cultural analysis. You need both to do diligence on countries or companies or people.

Younger Next Year: A Guide to Living Like 50 Until You’re 80 and Beyond – Chris Cowley and Henry Lodge

Ignore the occasional off-putting sexism and you’ll get great advice (I think). I have 100% adopted the physical routine but am still struggling with the dietary routine.

Good Profit: How Creating Value for Others Built One of the World’s Most Successful Companies – Charles Koch

Whatever you think of Koch politics, this is an insightful read on how a founder’s philosophy, psychology, and personal values infuse a company, for better or for worse.

Miracle Man – William Leibowitz

A fun read!

 

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